1953 TOPPS BASEBALL #266 WRONG BACK CARD.

Discussion in 'What's it Worth?' started by david, Feb 10, 2014.

  1. david

    david New Member

    15.jpg 15a.jpg the front of this card is #266 bob cain and the back of the card is #13 connie marrero. any opinions on what it might be worth?
  2. IQless1

    IQless1 Active Member

    I couldn't find any info on it at all, sorry.

    If legit, it could potentially be worth quite a bit.

    If at all possible, you may want to send it to a company that specializes in authenticating such things. Modern printers can copy pretty well, but they tend to leave tell-tale signs that only close examination can reveal. It's best to leave that kind of thing to the professionals.
    david likes this.
  3. david

    david New Member

    Picture0016.JPG Picture0024 (2).JPG
    thanks for the reply. i bought three different 1953 topps wrongback cards in 2012. they were all from the same seller, and the fact that the cards have wrongbacks was not mentioned in the sellers listings for the cards. i sold 2 of the cards and i still have the #266 card. here is a photo of one of the other wrongback cards that i sold. the photo is not very good, i used a webcam, (this was before i had a scanner.) i sold the card for $76.55 on ebay. i made the mistake of sending the card to the buyer by regular first class mail. the buyer claimed that he never received the card and ebay refunded the buyer. i did not receive payment for the card and the card was never returned to me.
  4. IQless1

    IQless1 Active Member

    Your welcome.

    I simply don't know much about those earlier sets, so I can't say if they are real or fakes. I can make an educated guess, when I have legit cards to compare them with, but I do know the counterfeits increase when a player passes. David Philley passed in 2012, for instance, so it's possible it's a fake. What happens is they get sloppy. I'm guessing here but, it's likely they print these out in sheets and failed to use the proper back for the proper card.

    As for your loss, deliver confirmation, or it's equivalent, is a must when sending packages to people. It doesn't solve every problem (someone could still say it wasn't in the package), but you'll at least have proof something was delivered. Most people, when they claim it was never delivered, immediately see that lying like that can bring federal charges into play.

    For instance, I once paid a guy on eBay with a money order. He claimed he never got it. I went to the P.O. and had them trace it, proving he did indeed cash it. I got my cards pretty quick after I sent him the proof.

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